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‘Dickie V.’ is a sentimental tribute to ESPN’s Dick Vitale

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At 83, Vitale is clearly emotional as he looks back at the life that he has enjoyed, having thrived as a college coach and gotten fired by the Detroit Pistons before reluctantly stumbling into color commentary, calling his first game for a then-fledgling network called ESPN in December 1979.

Vitale won over many fans with his infectious enthusiasm and love of the game, and coaches with his dense knowledge of how they operated. “In the midst of all that passion there was really good basketball knowledge,” says Notre Dame coach Mike Brey.

There are plenty of heartwarming elements to Vitale’s story, from his romance with wife Lorraine to his friendship with the late Jim Valvano, another coach turned analyst who died of cancer. Vitale will be honored with the award named for Valvano at the ESPYs on July 20.

Vitale also talks emotionally about having lost vision in one of his eyes and his sensitivity to the way that looked, as an adult as well as a child.

At its core, though, “Dickie V.” is a chronicle of what Vitale has meant to college basketball, and vice versa, and it’s there where the documentary feels a bit half-baked. Specifically, Vitale’s coziness with coaches colored his approach to covering them, singing their praises while often overlooking their excesses.

“He builds. He doesn’t tear down,” says Kentucky coach John Calipari, which sounds laudable, except for the fact that there are aspects of collegiate sports that deserve to be torn down, or at least viewed through a more objective prism, as New York Post columnist Phil Mushnick pointed out several years ago. Those observations drew a rebuke from Vitale, who has never hidden his admiration for figures like controversial coach Bob Knight or Calipari.

Nor does “Dickie V.” address how Vitale’s bombastic style has been adopted by other analysts, some of whom have turned up the volume to ridiculous levels. While imitation is a form of flattery, that, too, represents a part of his legacy.

Former Notre Dame coach turned analyst Digger Phelps calls Vitale “the master of marketing,” which has indeed been part of his genius, serving as what amounted to an ambassador for college basketball, in a way that has earned admiration from his broadcasting peers and coaches alike. “I’m in awe of Dick Vitale,” says “SportsCenter” anchor Scott Van Pelt.

It’s certainly hard to fault ESPN’s sentiment or timing, coming as it does, as Vitale tearfully notes, in “the last chapter” of a blessed life. But “Dickie V.” works better as a tribute than it does as a fully-realized look at not only Vitale’s unique voice, but the echoes associated with it.

“Dickie V.” premieres July 20 on ESPN+ and July 23 at 4 p.m. ET on ESPN.

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Jamie Foxx rises again as dad, the vampire hunter, in Netflix’s dreary ‘Day Shift’ | CNN

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CNN
 — 

“Day Shift” is about vampires, but it’s one of those Frankenstein-like movies stitched together from used parts, with Jamie Foxx as a family man version of Marvel’s Blade, mashed up with horror and buddy comedy. It’s the kind of star-driven vehicle that yields obvious benefits to Netflix even if, qualitatively speaking, it doesn’t deserve to see the light of day.

Indeed, Foxx is clearly a favorite of the Netflix algorithm and likes cashing its checks, having starred in the movie “Project Power” and sitcom “Dad Stop Embarrassing Me!” in the last two years, the latter inspired and produced by his daughter, Corinne Foxx.

Parenthood is again at the heart of the plot, such as it is, in “Day Shift,” which could just as easily be titled “Dad: Vampire Slayer.” Foxx plays Bud Jablonski, a bounty hunter (he masquerades as a pool cleaner) struggling to make ends meet financially, suddenly given a major motivation to earn cash: His ex (Meagan Good) is planning to move away from Los Angeles with their young daughter (Zion Broadnax).

Unfortunately, Bud is on bad terms with the international vampire-hunting union, which assigns a nervous office worker, his union rep Seth (Dave Franco), to ride along with Bud and try to catch him committing code violations that will allow them to torpedo his career. That produces lots of banter, bickering and unfortunately, pants wetting, a natural if low-brow response to the new-to-him prospect of getting killed.

“Day Shift” mostly appears to exist for the violent, martial-arts-flavored fight sequences (these vampires are unexpectedly susceptible to getting punched in the face), but after the first encounter in which Bud dispatches an “old lady” who turns out to be a lot more than that, the abundant action yields diminishing returns.

There’s also a disposable villain, Audrey (“How to Get Away With Murder’s” Karla Souza), an ancient vampire who is sucking up real estate in the San Fernando Valley – an apt metaphor for the Southern California’s pricey housing market, perhaps, but otherwise pretty ho-hum as such threats go.

Making his directing debut, veteran stuntman J.J. Perry and writers Tyler Tice and Shay Hatten seek to unearth laughs and fun where they can, which includes having Snoop Dogg on board as a veteran vampire hunter. But like everything else in “Day Shift,” the movie has the feel of being made up as it goes along in between the fight scenes, anemically building toward a loud, long and tedious climactic showdown.

As noted, Netflix has exhibited a thirst for projects with Foxx on the marquee, and “Day Shift” will probably pay off in terms of its minutes-viewed criteria.

Yet while this form of escapism might yield bottom-line dividends thanks to the combination of premise and star, this is the sort of lifeless effort where the prudent advice would be not to quit your day jobs.

“Day Shift” premieres Aug. 12 on Netflix. It’s rated R.

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Beyoncé Rocks Fishnets, Daisy Dukes, Metal Dress & More Looks in ‘I’m That Girl’ Music Video Teaser

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Beyoncé gave her fans a taste of what’s coming next as part of her Renaissance. On Friday (Aug. 12), Beyoncé, 40, shared the “official teaser” to “I’M THAT GIRL,” presumably the music video for the first track on her new album. At the beginning of the visual, Bey is a domestic goddess who is one part Barbarella, one part Rosie from The Jetsons, and all queen. While wearing a chrome body piece with matching silver boots, Beyonce poses throughout a darkened home – first in the closet, then in the bedroom, before going to a kitchen where she cracks an egg off her metal outfit (while drinking a glass of wine.)

However, this take on The Stepford Wives gives way to a whole new dream. As Bey walks out the front door, her outfit shifts. Suddenly, she’s in a club in a black gown with metal embellishments. Then, she’s outside in a midriff-bearing half-shirt and a pair of dotted booty shorts. Then, she’s on a bar in a pair of fishnet stockings and a black bodice. A horse, presumably the one from the Renaissance cover art, appears, and Bey serenades it while going into “I’m That Girl.” The teaser also showcased a gun outfitted with a mic at the end, adding a little bit more danger and sexiness to this tease.

Somewhere in this fashion show, a montage plays (around the 0:38 mark), showing Bey in a series of looks – messy hair and a red robe, zebra-striped sunglasses and a furry-sleeved dress, the hat from the “Break My Soul” cover art, a wet look, a helmet that makes it look like Bey has many faces – hinting that this teaser is for more than just a music video.

Beyoncé is no stranger to visual art. She famously released a visual album to Lemonade in 2016, earning her a handful of Primetime Emmy nominations. In 2020, Beyoncé wrote, directed, and executively produced Black Is King, a visual companion to the 2019 album, The Lion King: The Gift, which Bey also curated. Black Is King won Best Music Film at the 63rd Grammy Awards, while “Brown Skin Girl” won Best Music Video (giving Blue Ivy Carter, Bey’s daughter, her first Grammy Award.) Plus, “Black Parade” won the Grammy for Best R&B Performance, giving Beyoncé her 28th grammy win. With that, Bey became the most awarded singer and female artist in Grammy history.

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Evan Rachel Wood Tells Judge She Did Not Forge FBI Letter That Ex Marilyn Manson Claims She Drafted To Take Him Down.

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Evan Rachel Wood Tells Judge She Did Not Forge FBI Letter That Ex Marilyn Manson Claims She Drafted To Take Him Down.

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