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‘Teen Wolf: The Movie’ Teaser Reveals Allison Is Back From the Dead

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The wolf pack is back. The first teaser for the upcoming film sequel to “Teen Wolf” was released at Comic-Con on Thursday, showcasing the return of the original show’s cast in the Paramount+ original movie.

One of the biggest reveals of the trailer came in the final moments, when Crystal Reed’s character Allison returns from the dead.

“I wanted to make sure I did the character justice,” creator Jeff Davis said at the “Teen Wolf” panel. “Having her back was amazing. I texted Crystal, ‘We don’t really have a story yet. I mostly have ideas but I always said if I was gonna do a movie, I would bring back Allison.’ She texted back and said that she burst into tears. She was in from that moment.”

When asked about what it was like working with Reed again, star Tyler Posey — who was happy to report that the cast could finally swear in the more mature “Teen Wolf” movie — said it was “fuckin’ awesome.”

“We’ve grown up. For Scott, it fuckin’ rocks his world. He doesn’t know what to think,” Posey teased on the panel.

In the series, Allison died at the end of Season 3, after Reed decided to leave the show. The teaser, however, reveals that the character is back from the grave under mysterious circumstances. After footage of several characters from the original series struggling against shadowy new enemies, with a bombastic narrator predicting their downfall, the teaser ends with Scott meeting Allison’s father Chris (JR Bourne) in the hospital to inform him that Allison is alive, followed by footage of Reed walking in the rain, equipped with a bow and arrow.

“I told Paramount+ I absolutely can’t do another season, and they said ‘What about a movie?’” Davis said. “I realized we were writing a very long movie because we have 20 main characters. I realized I wrote a short Season 7; we’ll see how much lasts in the final cut.” Davis also noted that more “Teen Wolf” may be coming, as long as the fans support it and sign up for Paramount+, he joked.

The panel, consisting of Davis, Posey and Hoechlin, revealed that that the movie jumps far ahead in time, and Scott is now 50 (for the first time, Scott is older than Posey is in real life, the actor noted). Scott has left Beacon Hills and is now living in Los Angeles, where he is living a “normal,” “lonely” life. Derek also has a son, which Hoechlin helped handpick as a producer during the audition process.

An extremely loose adaptation of the 1985 teen comedy starring Michael J. Fox, “Teen Wolf” aired on MTV from 2011 to 2017 and starred Posey as Scott, an ordinary teenager who becomes a werewolf and ends up assembling a “pack” to help defend the town of Beacon Hills from supernatural threats. Over the course of the show’s 100 episodes, he allies himself with a wide array of characters, including werewolf hunter Allison, older werewolf Derek (Tyler Hoechlin) and banshee Lydia (Holland Roden).

“Teen Wolf: The Movie” sees many main and recurring cast members return to their roles, with Posey being joined by Reed, Roden, Hoechlin, Shelley Hennig, Orny Adams, Linden Ashby, Bourne, Seth Gilliam, Colton Haynes, Ryan Kelley, Melissa Ponzio, Dylan Sprayberry, Khylin Rhambo and Ian Bohen. Davis, the creator of the original series, wrote and executive produced the film for Paramount+.

Although most of the original series cast will be returning for the movie, a few key players will be M.I.A for the wolf pack’s return. Most significantly, Dylan O’Brien, who played fan-favorite character Stiles throughout the show’s entire run, will not return to the film, telling Variety earlier this year that it was a “difficult decision.” In addition, Arden Cho, who played Thunder Kitsune Kira for three seasons, passed on returning after reportedly being offered a lower salary than most of her co-stars.

While there are currently no plans for a new “Teen Wolf” series, the movie isn’t the only werewolf-based property set to premiere on Paramount+ this year. Davis is currently in production on another werewolf show, “Wolf Pack,” which is based on the book series by Canadian horror author Edo Van Belkom and is not connected to “Teen Wolf.”

“Teen Wolf: The Movie” will premiere on Paramount+ later this year. Watch the teaser below.



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Timothée Chalamet Is A Heartthrob Cannibal In Bones & All Trailer

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The Bones & All teaser trailer reveals the first footage of Timothée Chalamet’s romantic cannibal in his reunion with director Luca Guadagnino. The two first collaborated on the 2017 LGBTQ+ romantic drama Call Me By Your Name, which resulted in Oscar nominations for both Chalamet and Guadagnino. Now, the actor and director have reunited for another coming-of-age romance based on an acclaimed novel. Bones & All was written by Camille DeAngelis and adapted for the screen by Guadagnino’s frequent screenwriter David Kajganich.

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Chalamet and Escape Room‘s Taylor Russell lead the Bones & All cast as Lee and Maren, two young cannibals living on the margins of society who meet and set out together on a thousand-mile road trip. The film touts an impressive supporting cast that includes Mark Rylance, Michael Stuhlbarg, André Holland, Jessica Harper, Chloë Sevigny, Francesca Scorsese, and Halloween director David Gordon Green. The first Bones & All images revealing Chalamet and Russell’s lovesick flesh eaters arrived late last month, but now audiences are finally getting a glimpse of some footage.


A month ahead of the film’s premiere, Chalamet shared the first Bones & All trailer on Twitter. The 30-second teaser reveals the first footage of Chalamet and Russell’s infatuated teenage cannibals as they embark on a perilous cross-country odyssey, featuring an original score by Oscar winners Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross. Watch the trailer below:

There are only two lines of dialogue spoken in the 30-second teaser, beginning with Lee asking his love interest, “You don’t think I’m a bad person?” and ending with Maren’s reply, “All I think is that I love you.” Still, the trailer’s short runtime is more than enough give audiences an idea of Bones & All‘s overall tone, which includes some prevalent horror vibes largely due to Rylance’s unsettling character. Romance and horror seem to be Guadagnino’s preferred genres, so an amalgam of the two would an appropriate next step for the director. His past two feature films were Suspiria, a supernatural horror, and Call Me By Your Name, a slow burn romantic drama.


In between Bones & All‘s tenderly romantic moments, it appears there will be plenty of thrills as Lee and Maren have to evade the many dangers lurking in the “back roads, hidden passages and trap doors of Ronald Reagan’s America,” as the official synopsis indicates. Based on this first footage, Bones & All is shaping up to be another must-see collaboration between Chalamet and Guadagnino. The film is set for a world premiere at the Venice Film Festival next month, after which it will be released in theaters on November 23.

Source: Timothée Chalamet/Twitter



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‘Mack & Rita’ Review: Diane Keaton is a Millennial Misfit Embracing Granny Chic in a Confused Body-Swap Comedy

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“Mack & Rita,” the third film by Sundance darling Katie Aselton, is a bewildering generational culture-war comedy that sides with every j’accuse that baby boomers hurl at millennials. Mack (Elizabeth Lail), an awkward author turned reluctant influencer, describes herself as a “70-year-old in the body of a 30-year-old.” She tiptoes through life terrified to be out of step with her cohorts’ harsh judgments. Here, according to screenwriters Madeline Walter and Paul Welsh (both of “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” who aren’t so much satirizing stereotypes about their own demographic as endorsing them), millennials recoil at reading, diners, scarves, carpeting, silence, sensible shoes, chain restaurants and non-conformity. In one scene, 50% of millennials don’t even understand the word “lothario.”

Exhausted from the pressure to sport thigh-high, spike-heeled snakeskin boots to a bottomless mimosa brunch, Mack stumbles across a shady huckster (“Red Rocket” star Simon Rex), collapses in his regression tank — and emerges in the body of Diane Keaton. The body-swapping contrivance is easier to believe than anything the film does with it. Introducing herself to the world as Mack’s Aunt Rita, the character unchains herself from youthful expectations and finds herself instantly embraced by the young as an elderly Instagram influencer: a “glamma,” in the words of her ferociously callow agent (Patti Harrison).

On its own, that twist isn’t so hard to believe in a summer where teens and twenty-somethings on TikTok have made trends of granny-chic classics like embroidered LL Bean tote bags and white linen trousers, as popularized by Keaton herself in her collaborations with Nancy Meyers. (A sequence where the newly transformed Aunt Rita picks up a kooky blazer and wide belt is presented with the anticipation of Bruce Wayne reaching for his cowl.) What’s mystifying is that the film has no grip on what it means to say about Aunt Rita’s overnight ascension into a millennial style icon. Were Mack’s hangups all in her head? (Not according to the opening scenes.) Is oddball fashion okay only when older people do it? (Not according to the ending scenes.) Should Mack/Rita embrace being an influencer after all? (No, but then yes, but then no, but wait — yes!)

Most audiences will give up sifting through these mixed messages by the time Aunt Rita squires her decades-younger neighbor Jack (Dustin Milligan) on a defiantly dorky date to a California Pizza Kitchen. The scene is about the two bonding over being uncool. But the film’s hummingbird attention span immediately discards its own setup for a throwaway joke where Rita gets jealous that their lunch is interrupted by a hipster babe in a midriff-baring top who also happens to be eating there.

“Mack & Rita” does as little with its ambition to turn Rita and Jack’s romance into an updated “Harold and Maude” as it does with its own grandstanding against agism. Agism is wrong, we’re told. Except when it comes to the shameful fact that Jack continues to skateboard as a man in his early thirties — a hobby that every character, including Rita, agrees is totally lame — in which case agism is totally correct. Momentarily, the film argues that getting old gives Rita the perspective to better stick up for herself — but this thesis, too, about-faces when Rita finds herself cowed into a situation that results in her literally being set on fire.

Keaton does her best with the material. Her own inner youth shines through the character even when the script lets her down, forcing her to wail in distress at the sight of her hair and breasts, or putting her through a punishingly long physical comedy scene where she struggles to use a pilates machine. The film does, at minimum, convince us that most people would want to transform into Keaton if given the opportunity.

Even more so, it convinces us that most actors are ecstatic to work alongside her: Keaton’s presence is the only reason one can imagine that talents like Taylour Paige, Loretta Devine, Wendi Malick, Lois Smith, and Nicole Byer signed on to this project to play the various friends and acquaintances in her orbit, each part more underwritten than the next. As for Rex, essentially cast as a human Voltar machine, he’s a funny blend of scuzzy smooth-talker and baffled inventor when his hand-painted tanning bed zaps the plot into motion. “Time is merely a construct!” he barks. That mantra may help the film go by faster.



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Why Orphan 2’s Julia Stiles Joined The First Kill Prequel Movie

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Julia Stiles says there was something about the script for Orphan: First Kill that convinced her it may just be on par with the original movie.

Julia Stiles says she joined Orphan: First Kill after reading a major twist in the script that had her “hooked.” The upcoming sequel is a rare foray into horror for Stiles, whose last major project in the genre was the 2006 remake of The Omen. In the first Orphan, Kate and John Coleman (Vera Farmiga and Peter Sarsgaard) adopt 9-year-old Esther (Isabelle Fuhrman) from a local orphanage after losing their unborn child. Before long, violent and disturbing accidents begin to plague the family, and it becomes clear that Esther is not as innocent as they thought.

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Orphan became a cult favorite for its freaky twist: Esther is actually a murderous, 33-year-old escapee from an Estonian mental hospital. She has a rare hormonal disorder that keeps her looking like a little girl, which she uses to take advantage of her adoptive families before she murders them. By the time the Colemans discover her secret, it’s already too late, and Esther kills John and one of the Colemans’ other children before Kate breaks her neck and leaves her at the bottom of a pond. Orphan: First Kill will be a prequel that follows Esther’s first adoptive family, with Stiles playing her new mother who gets more than she bargained for.


Stiles now teases that the next Orphan will be as unpredictable as the first during a recent appearance on Live with Kelly and Ryan (via EW). She says she signed onto the film after reading a twist in the script that became “the reason I wanted to be in the movie,” and also confirms that Orphan: First Kill will fill in the pieces of Esther’s backstory that were teased in the original. Read Stiles’ full comment below:

“This one is before [the first one]. [Esther] is in another family. She’s escaped a mental hospital and pretends to be the long-lost, missing daughter for this family. When they sent me the script, there’s a twist that when I got to the twist I was like, ‘Oh, that’s good,’ and I was hooked. I did not see it coming, and it was also the reason that I wanted to be in the movie.”

It’s hard to imagine that there could possibly be a twist as out of left-field and unpredictable as the one in the original Orphan, but if it convinced Stiles to come back to horror after almost two decades, it must be a good one. Hopefully, it will live up to the high expectations audiences may have now. It will also be especially creepy to see this perceived-child’s origin at the mental hospital that – as fans will remember – gave her the scars she slyly covers up with ribbons on her wrists and neck. Orphan: First Kill has the ingredients to be an intriguing and genuinely chilling second installment.


It also marks something of a milestone for the horror genre itself. Fuhrman was 10 years old when she filmed Orphan, and she was 24 when she returned to the role for the prequel. Not only will she be bringing back the character, she’ll also be playing a version of Esther that’s even younger than the one she played 15 years ago. It’s a fun challenge for any actor, and fans will be able to deem Orphan: First Kill a worthy prequel for themselves when it comes out in theaters and streams on Paramount+ on August 19.

Source: Live with Kelly and Ryan (via EW)

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